CONTACT RBT ON 1300 774 244

The Intermediate Guide to Incredible Results

The Intermediate Guide to Incredible Results

You’ve got your diet down.

You’re on point with tracking calories, counting your macros, and making sure you get a balance of nutrient-dense foods in, along with the little treat here and there.

Hey, perhaps My Fitness Pal has overtaken Facebook as the most used app on your phone – THAT is how serious you are.

And the results are coming – but they’re not quite where you want them to be.

And that’s because, as much as you can lose weight purely from dieting, to really get the body of your dreams – a lean, toned, athletic physique with curves in all the right places, diet alone is not enough.

Enter Training 

You may already be training, and if you are, that’s great.

You have a leg up over every other girl who thinks that she can look awesome just by cutting down on wine at weekends and having some disgusting vegetable smoothie concoction for breakfast.

But training in itself won’t give you better progress.

Let’s look at the first 3 levels of training expertise:

1. The Cardio Queen

Cardio helps burn fat – no doubt.

But if you’re spinning your wheels (almost literally) just on the stationary bike, the treadmill, or attending the odd aerobics class, you’re at level 1.

Even if you do the odd bit of lifting on fixed weight machines, or using very light dumbbells and bands, you’re in this category.

Maybe it’s time to step it up?

2. The Blossoming Beginner

You’ve taken your first shaky steps from the cardio section of the gym, and embraced the wonder that is weight training.

You might even have checked out, or be following our beginner’s training plan, where we had you squatting, deadlifting, pressing, lunging and rowing.

(http://www.resultbasedtraining.com.au/women-and-weights-the-ultimate-beginner-guide/ )

You’re getting used to handling free-weights, building a strength base, and starting to see stellar results.

3. The Informed Intermediate

If you’ve been in the beginner stage for a while, it’s time to take things up a notch.

4-6 months following a basic free-weight program, and you’ll undoubtedly be –

  • Stronger
  • Leaner
  • Fitter
  • More confident
  • And starting to see some huge differences in your physique

But you may also be a little bored. Perhaps you’d like some new, more challenging exercises?

Hit a plateau? Then your rep ranges, volume and frequency may need changing.

In all honesty, you’re probably done with the beginner stage; hence, it seems appropriate to move on to something a little more driven. You’re now an informed intermediate, and you need a program that reflects this.

Which is why this article is for you.

Flashback

Take a look back at the beginner’s guide – http://www.resultbasedtraining.com.au/women-and-weights-the-ultimate-beginner-guide/

There’s quite a bit there – a wide variety of exercises, varying rep ranges, and 3 tough, but manageable workouts each week.

The basic premises need not change when moving from beginner to intermediate programming, but what we will do is get a little more in-depth.

We’ll be adding an extra day, so you’re now training 4 days per week, and switching to an upper-body/ lower-body split. This will allow for a greater volume of work each session, and allow for a bit longer recovery, too, while still hitting your muscles often enough for optimal results.

Sort Your Schedule 

With 2 upper-body and 2 lower-body days each week, you’ll need to set aside 4 days for weights.

A typical schedule would be –

Monday – Upper 1

Tuesday – Lower 1

Wednesday – Rest/ Cardio

Thursday – Upper 2

Friday – Lower 2

Saturday/ Sunday – Rest/ Cardio

You can tweak things if needed though. Provided you’re not hitting 2 upper-body, or 2 lower-body days consecutively, you’re okay.

Your first upper and lower session of each week will be more strength-based, while your second workouts will be a little higher rep, slightly lighter with the weights, and focus on a bigger exercise volume.

Here’s your set-up:

The Workouts

Upper 1:

Bench Press – 3 sets of 4-6 reps

Standing Overhead Press – 2 sets of 5-8 reps

Chin-Ups (or negative chin-ups if you can’t do full reps yet) – 5 sets of 3-5 reps

Barbell or Dumbbell Rows – 3 sets of 5-8 reps

Biceps Curls – 2 sets of 8-10 reps

Close-Grip Bench Presses – 2 sets of 8-10 reps

Lower 1:

Deadlift – 3 sets of 4-6 reps

Back Squats – 3 sets of 4-6 reps

Dumbbell Lunges – 4 sets of 6-8 reps

Leg Curls – 4 sets of 8-10 reps

Calf Raises – 3 sets of 8-10 reps

With these strength-based sessions, your goal each workout is to lift a little heavier, or perform more reps.

Taking the deadlift from the lower workout for example.

In week 1, you might perform 3 sets of 4 reps using 50kg. Next time round, you’d aim for 3 sets of 5 or 6 reps using the same weight. Once you get to the top range (i.e. 3 sets of 6) drop the volume back down to 3 sets of 4, but up the weight. So the session after this would be 3 sets of 4 with 52.5 or 55kg.

Upper 2:

Lat Pulldowns – 3 sets of 10-12

Cable Rows – 3 sets of 10-12

Incline Dumbbell Press – 3 sets of 8-10

Dumbbell Shoulder Press – 2 sets of 10-12

Flyes or Press-Ups – 2 sets of 12-15

Biceps Curls – 3 sets of 12-15

Triceps Pushdowns – 3 sets of 12-15

Lower 2:

Front Squats – 4 sets of 8-10

Stiff-Legged Deadlift – 4 sets of 8-10

Leg Press – 3 sets of 12-15

Leg Extension – 3 sets of 15-20

Leg Curls or Hip Thrusts – 3 sets of 12-15

Calf Raises – 4 sets of 12-15

The focus here is less on weight, and more on mind-muscle connection – really feeling the muscle working. While you don’t need a “slow” tempo, taking around 1 second to lift and 1-2 seconds to lower the weight works best.

Anything Else

I guess the main thing you might want to think about is whether you’re an “intermediate” yet?

While there’s no definitive answer, according to strength coach Lon Kilgore, an intermediate female lifter should be able to

  • Bench press around 70-75% of bodyweight
  • Squat 100% of bodyweight
  • Deadlift 110-115% of bodyweight
    (1,2,3)

If you’re not quite there yet, don’t worry.

Jump back on the beginner’s program, and work your butt off! The beginner’s program is still a fantastic template for getting you lean, fit and strong.

If you’re at the stage though, where you need a little more, and your strength levels are rising, then you, my friend, are perfectly set for the intermediate’s guide.

Magic Mike
Coach
Result Based Training

References

  1. http://www.exrx.net/Testing/WeightLifting/BenchStandards.html
  2. http://www.exrx.net/Testing/WeightLifting/SquatStandards.html
  3. http://www.exrx.net/Testing/WeightLifting/DeadliftStandards.html

 

SIGN UP FOR YOUR 28 DAY TRANSFORMATION!

0 Comments

Leave a reply

The Intermediate Guide to Incredible Results

The Intermediate Guide to Incredible Results

The Intermediate Guide to Incredible Results

You’ve got your diet down.

You’re on point with tracking calories, counting your macros, and making sure you get a balance of nutrient-dense foods in, along with the little treat here and there.

Hey, perhaps My Fitness Pal has overtaken Facebook as the most used app on your phone – THAT is how serious you are.

And the results are coming – but they’re not quite where you want them to be.

And that’s because, as much as you can lose weight purely from dieting, to really get the body of your dreams – a lean, toned, athletic physique with curves in all the right places, diet alone is not enough.

Enter Training 

You may already be training, and if you are, that’s great.

You have a leg up over every other girl who thinks that she can look awesome just by cutting down on wine at weekends and having some disgusting vegetable smoothie concoction for breakfast.

But training in itself won’t give you better progress.

Let’s look at the first 3 levels of training expertise:

1. The Cardio Queen

Cardio helps burn fat – no doubt.

But if you’re spinning your wheels (almost literally) just on the stationary bike, the treadmill, or attending the odd aerobics class, you’re at level 1.

Even if you do the odd bit of lifting on fixed weight machines, or using very light dumbbells and bands, you’re in this category.

Maybe it’s time to step it up?

2. The Blossoming Beginner

You’ve taken your first shaky steps from the cardio section of the gym, and embraced the wonder that is weight training.

You might even have checked out, or be following our beginner’s training plan, where we had you squatting, deadlifting, pressing, lunging and rowing.

(http://www.resultbasedtraining.com.au/women-and-weights-the-ultimate-beginner-guide/ )

You’re getting used to handling free-weights, building a strength base, and starting to see stellar results.

3. The Informed Intermediate

If you’ve been in the beginner stage for a while, it’s time to take things up a notch.

4-6 months following a basic free-weight program, and you’ll undoubtedly be –

  • Stronger
  • Leaner
  • Fitter
  • More confident
  • And starting to see some huge differences in your physique

But you may also be a little bored. Perhaps you’d like some new, more challenging exercises?

Hit a plateau? Then your rep ranges, volume and frequency may need changing.

In all honesty, you’re probably done with the beginner stage; hence, it seems appropriate to move on to something a little more driven. You’re now an informed intermediate, and you need a program that reflects this.

Which is why this article is for you.

Flashback

Take a look back at the beginner’s guide – http://www.resultbasedtraining.com.au/women-and-weights-the-ultimate-beginner-guide/

There’s quite a bit there – a wide variety of exercises, varying rep ranges, and 3 tough, but manageable workouts each week.

The basic premises need not change when moving from beginner to intermediate programming, but what we will do is get a little more in-depth.

We’ll be adding an extra day, so you’re now training 4 days per week, and switching to an upper-body/ lower-body split. This will allow for a greater volume of work each session, and allow for a bit longer recovery, too, while still hitting your muscles often enough for optimal results.

Sort Your Schedule 

With 2 upper-body and 2 lower-body days each week, you’ll need to set aside 4 days for weights.

A typical schedule would be –

Monday – Upper 1

Tuesday – Lower 1

Wednesday – Rest/ Cardio

Thursday – Upper 2

Friday – Lower 2

Saturday/ Sunday – Rest/ Cardio

You can tweak things if needed though. Provided you’re not hitting 2 upper-body, or 2 lower-body days consecutively, you’re okay.

Your first upper and lower session of each week will be more strength-based, while your second workouts will be a little higher rep, slightly lighter with the weights, and focus on a bigger exercise volume.

Here’s your set-up:

The Workouts

Upper 1:

Bench Press – 3 sets of 4-6 reps

Standing Overhead Press – 2 sets of 5-8 reps

Chin-Ups (or negative chin-ups if you can’t do full reps yet) – 5 sets of 3-5 reps

Barbell or Dumbbell Rows – 3 sets of 5-8 reps

Biceps Curls – 2 sets of 8-10 reps

Close-Grip Bench Presses – 2 sets of 8-10 reps

Lower 1:

Deadlift – 3 sets of 4-6 reps

Back Squats – 3 sets of 4-6 reps

Dumbbell Lunges – 4 sets of 6-8 reps

Leg Curls – 4 sets of 8-10 reps

Calf Raises – 3 sets of 8-10 reps

With these strength-based sessions, your goal each workout is to lift a little heavier, or perform more reps.

Taking the deadlift from the lower workout for example.

In week 1, you might perform 3 sets of 4 reps using 50kg. Next time round, you’d aim for 3 sets of 5 or 6 reps using the same weight. Once you get to the top range (i.e. 3 sets of 6) drop the volume back down to 3 sets of 4, but up the weight. So the session after this would be 3 sets of 4 with 52.5 or 55kg.

Upper 2:

Lat Pulldowns – 3 sets of 10-12

Cable Rows – 3 sets of 10-12

Incline Dumbbell Press – 3 sets of 8-10

Dumbbell Shoulder Press – 2 sets of 10-12

Flyes or Press-Ups – 2 sets of 12-15

Biceps Curls – 3 sets of 12-15

Triceps Pushdowns – 3 sets of 12-15

Lower 2:

Front Squats – 4 sets of 8-10

Stiff-Legged Deadlift – 4 sets of 8-10

Leg Press – 3 sets of 12-15

Leg Extension – 3 sets of 15-20

Leg Curls or Hip Thrusts – 3 sets of 12-15

Calf Raises – 4 sets of 12-15

The focus here is less on weight, and more on mind-muscle connection – really feeling the muscle working. While you don’t need a “slow” tempo, taking around 1 second to lift and 1-2 seconds to lower the weight works best.

Anything Else

I guess the main thing you might want to think about is whether you’re an “intermediate” yet?

While there’s no definitive answer, according to strength coach Lon Kilgore, an intermediate female lifter should be able to

  • Bench press around 70-75% of bodyweight
  • Squat 100% of bodyweight
  • Deadlift 110-115% of bodyweight
    (1,2,3)

If you’re not quite there yet, don’t worry.

Jump back on the beginner’s program, and work your butt off! The beginner’s program is still a fantastic template for getting you lean, fit and strong.

If you’re at the stage though, where you need a little more, and your strength levels are rising, then you, my friend, are perfectly set for the intermediate’s guide.

Magic Mike
Coach
Result Based Training

References

  1. http://www.exrx.net/Testing/WeightLifting/BenchStandards.html
  2. http://www.exrx.net/Testing/WeightLifting/SquatStandards.html
  3. http://www.exrx.net/Testing/WeightLifting/DeadliftStandards.html

 

0 Comments

Leave a reply