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Results in One Week: Is It Possible?

Results in One Week: Is It Possible?

We’re an impatient bunch, us humans.

We want results, and we want them now.

7-day detoxes, 2-week blitzes, 30-day transformations – all these are shoved down our throats so often that it’s no wonder we’re always quick to jump on the latest bandwagon, dedicate ourselves to misery and suffering for a short period of time, all in the hope of gaining an awesome physique.

Unfortunately though, this awesome physique doesn’t usually come about.

And even when it does, we get it at a cost.

Such short-term diets do not prioritise health.

They focus on cutting out as much stuff as possible, of restricting us as much as we can physically and mentally bear, and testing our emotions to breaking point, all with the aim of dropping as much body fat in as little time as possible.

Those who do get lean and shredded on a short-term diet never manage to maintain this – you might hold your current condition for a week or two, then before you know it, old habits kick in, and you’re back to lounging on the couch every night, watching movies and stuffing your face, not even thinking about the gym.

Short-term, quick-fix diets never work. So why is this article about to endorse them?

Sometimes You Need a Quickie

First and foremost, this article is not intended for anyone who’s never really dieted before, or someone who’s simply dieting for general health and fat loss.

For you, it really is a case of sustainable, maintainable progress.

That old advice of 0.5 – 1kg per week really does work best – you don’t get any nasty psychological and physiological rebounds from such an approach, and the weight you lose stays off. Forever.

Instead, this article is for those of you just looking for that last final push before competition.

You might have a sporting event you need to make weight for – such as a boxing match or a wrestling meet. Or, you could be competing in a strength sport such as powerlifting, or even an aesthetics-based contest, like a bodybuilding show, where you have to come in under a certain weight.

In fact, the word “weight” is crucial here.

This will only apply to you if your bodyweight is the foremost factor of importance. Once you remember that weight really doesn’t have much to do with body composition and how you look (it matters, but measurements, progress photos and how you look are far more important) you’ll realise that the methods outlined here are only to be used by serious competitors, where bodyweight can make or break their success.

If that’s you, read on.

10 Days Out

10 days away from your event, you need to take stock of where you are.

The amount of weight you can lose in a week will vary from person to person, and depending on a number of factors.

You’ll hear some people advise that even a person who is already lean can lose 5 to 7 kilos in the week before an event, and, while that may be possible, it’s certainly not advisable, and the detrimental effect it can have on your performance can be catastrophic.

So this is the time to think – “can I get there safely?”

For someone already very lean, up to 3 or 5 kilos is a doable amount to drop. If you’re a bit heavier and carrying a little excess body fat, then up to 7 to 10 kilos is realistic. Any more than that, and you might have to sacrifice the upcoming event and get better prepared for the next one.

Two Divides

We need to make a split here.

The first lot of advice will deal with people who have a weigh in on the day of their competition or event. If this is you, then unfortunately you’ve drawn the short straw.

Losing a lot of weight through the methods outlined in this article is fine, IF you have time between your weigh-in and competing to put it back on. If you’re weighing in just a few hours before, this is not you, so you’re going to have to take it slower, and accept some drop off in performance.

The second group of guys and girls will get slightly different advice. This is you if you have around 24 hours between weigh-in and competition. You can drop more weight, as you have time to put it back on before you need to be at your best.

Group 1 – On the Day Weigh Ins

Here’s what to do when you’re weighing in and competing on the same day. We’ll work this bullet point list in chronological order, and use Saturday as a hypothetical contest day, starting on the previous Friday.

  • Friday – Cut your carb intake by 30% and your fat intake by 20%. Keep protein the same.
  • Saturday – Use the same nutrition as Friday
  • Sunday – as above
  • Monday – weigh in. If you’re 1.5 kilos or less away from your required weight, don’t make any changes. If you’re 2 to 4 kilos away, drop your carbs and fat by a further 30% each.
  • Tuesday – Nutrition as Monday.
  • Wednesday – Weigh in. At this point, you should only be 0.5 to 1 kilos away from where you need to be. If you’re not, then add in 60 minutes of light to moderate cardio each day.
  • Thursday – Taper back your weight training so you’re only lifting at 60-70% of your usual intensity. Keep nutrition and cardio as Wednesday.
  • Friday – Just perform a light circuit style workout, and keep your nutrition as Thursday. Cut water and sodium intake by 25%.
  • Saturday – weigh in.
  • Sip on water and only take bites of food up until the weigh in. (Hopefully this will be fairly early.)
  • As soon as you’ve weighed in, load up on simple carbohydrates and sports drinks for electrolytes. Ideal meals include bananas dipped in peanut butter, rice cakes with jelly, protein and carb drinks, chocolate milk (if you tolerate dairy okay) and white bread sandwiches with salty deli meat.

Group 2 – Day Before Weigh Ins 

  • Friday – Cut your carb intake by 30% and your fat intake by 20%. Keep protein the same.
  • Saturday – Use the same nutrition as Friday
  • Sunday – weigh in. If you’re 1.5 kilos or less away from your required weight, don’t make any changes. If you’re 2 to 4 kilos away, drop your carbs and fat by a further 30% each.
  • Monday – weigh in. If you’re still more than 2 kilos away, drop by a further 10% each, and add 60 minutes of light to moderate cardio.
  • Tuesday – Keep everything the same as Monday.
  • Wednesday – Weigh in. If you’re more than 1 kilo away, drop carbs by a further 20% and add another 15 minutes of cardio.
  • Thursday – Weigh in. If you’re still over your limit, cut sodium by 25% and water by 25%, only sipping liquids past 6pm.
  • Friday – weigh in. Just take small bites of food and sips of water until the weigh in.

Post weigh-in – load up on carbs, fats and salty foods. Don’t go mad though – you could have up to 24 hours before you compete, so make sure you don’t eat so much you feel bloated, full and sick.

This is especially important if you have a physique competition or a photo shoot – you do not want to have a massive bloated belly and water retention around your joints!

  • Saturday – day of contest.

Keep your nutrition simple here – the focus should still be on carbs, with plenty of fluids and a decent amount of sodium, but once again, don’t overdo it. Only eat foods you know you tolerate well, and that give you energy.

The Wrap Up

Can you lose weight super fast in a week?

Yes.

Can you do it healthily?

Kind of.

These tactics are 100% NOT to be used by general dieters, or if you’re just preparing for your weekly weigh-in. But, they can be used with success in high-level athletes.

Whenever you embark on something like this, it’s best to do it under medical supervision, and to try a test run a few weeks out to make sure you can handle it.

Better still, make sure you’re at your desired weight a week out, then you can focus on chilling out, enjoying the week leading up to your event, and performing your best.

Magic Mike
Coach
Result Based Training

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Results in One Week: Is It Possible?

Results in One Week: Is It Possible?

Results in One Week: Is It Possible?

We’re an impatient bunch, us humans.

We want results, and we want them now.

7-day detoxes, 2-week blitzes, 30-day transformations – all these are shoved down our throats so often that it’s no wonder we’re always quick to jump on the latest bandwagon, dedicate ourselves to misery and suffering for a short period of time, all in the hope of gaining an awesome physique.

Unfortunately though, this awesome physique doesn’t usually come about.

And even when it does, we get it at a cost.

Such short-term diets do not prioritise health.

They focus on cutting out as much stuff as possible, of restricting us as much as we can physically and mentally bear, and testing our emotions to breaking point, all with the aim of dropping as much body fat in as little time as possible.

Those who do get lean and shredded on a short-term diet never manage to maintain this – you might hold your current condition for a week or two, then before you know it, old habits kick in, and you’re back to lounging on the couch every night, watching movies and stuffing your face, not even thinking about the gym.

Short-term, quick-fix diets never work. So why is this article about to endorse them?

Sometimes You Need a Quickie

First and foremost, this article is not intended for anyone who’s never really dieted before, or someone who’s simply dieting for general health and fat loss.

For you, it really is a case of sustainable, maintainable progress.

That old advice of 0.5 – 1kg per week really does work best – you don’t get any nasty psychological and physiological rebounds from such an approach, and the weight you lose stays off. Forever.

Instead, this article is for those of you just looking for that last final push before competition.

You might have a sporting event you need to make weight for – such as a boxing match or a wrestling meet. Or, you could be competing in a strength sport such as powerlifting, or even an aesthetics-based contest, like a bodybuilding show, where you have to come in under a certain weight.

In fact, the word “weight” is crucial here.

This will only apply to you if your bodyweight is the foremost factor of importance. Once you remember that weight really doesn’t have much to do with body composition and how you look (it matters, but measurements, progress photos and how you look are far more important) you’ll realise that the methods outlined here are only to be used by serious competitors, where bodyweight can make or break their success.

If that’s you, read on.

10 Days Out

10 days away from your event, you need to take stock of where you are.

The amount of weight you can lose in a week will vary from person to person, and depending on a number of factors.

You’ll hear some people advise that even a person who is already lean can lose 5 to 7 kilos in the week before an event, and, while that may be possible, it’s certainly not advisable, and the detrimental effect it can have on your performance can be catastrophic.

So this is the time to think – “can I get there safely?”

For someone already very lean, up to 3 or 5 kilos is a doable amount to drop. If you’re a bit heavier and carrying a little excess body fat, then up to 7 to 10 kilos is realistic. Any more than that, and you might have to sacrifice the upcoming event and get better prepared for the next one.

Two Divides

We need to make a split here.

The first lot of advice will deal with people who have a weigh in on the day of their competition or event. If this is you, then unfortunately you’ve drawn the short straw.

Losing a lot of weight through the methods outlined in this article is fine, IF you have time between your weigh-in and competing to put it back on. If you’re weighing in just a few hours before, this is not you, so you’re going to have to take it slower, and accept some drop off in performance.

The second group of guys and girls will get slightly different advice. This is you if you have around 24 hours between weigh-in and competition. You can drop more weight, as you have time to put it back on before you need to be at your best.

Group 1 – On the Day Weigh Ins

Here’s what to do when you’re weighing in and competing on the same day. We’ll work this bullet point list in chronological order, and use Saturday as a hypothetical contest day, starting on the previous Friday.

  • Friday – Cut your carb intake by 30% and your fat intake by 20%. Keep protein the same.
  • Saturday – Use the same nutrition as Friday
  • Sunday – as above
  • Monday – weigh in. If you’re 1.5 kilos or less away from your required weight, don’t make any changes. If you’re 2 to 4 kilos away, drop your carbs and fat by a further 30% each.
  • Tuesday – Nutrition as Monday.
  • Wednesday – Weigh in. At this point, you should only be 0.5 to 1 kilos away from where you need to be. If you’re not, then add in 60 minutes of light to moderate cardio each day.
  • Thursday – Taper back your weight training so you’re only lifting at 60-70% of your usual intensity. Keep nutrition and cardio as Wednesday.
  • Friday – Just perform a light circuit style workout, and keep your nutrition as Thursday. Cut water and sodium intake by 25%.
  • Saturday – weigh in.
  • Sip on water and only take bites of food up until the weigh in. (Hopefully this will be fairly early.)
  • As soon as you’ve weighed in, load up on simple carbohydrates and sports drinks for electrolytes. Ideal meals include bananas dipped in peanut butter, rice cakes with jelly, protein and carb drinks, chocolate milk (if you tolerate dairy okay) and white bread sandwiches with salty deli meat.

Group 2 – Day Before Weigh Ins 

  • Friday – Cut your carb intake by 30% and your fat intake by 20%. Keep protein the same.
  • Saturday – Use the same nutrition as Friday
  • Sunday – weigh in. If you’re 1.5 kilos or less away from your required weight, don’t make any changes. If you’re 2 to 4 kilos away, drop your carbs and fat by a further 30% each.
  • Monday – weigh in. If you’re still more than 2 kilos away, drop by a further 10% each, and add 60 minutes of light to moderate cardio.
  • Tuesday – Keep everything the same as Monday.
  • Wednesday – Weigh in. If you’re more than 1 kilo away, drop carbs by a further 20% and add another 15 minutes of cardio.
  • Thursday – Weigh in. If you’re still over your limit, cut sodium by 25% and water by 25%, only sipping liquids past 6pm.
  • Friday – weigh in. Just take small bites of food and sips of water until the weigh in.

Post weigh-in – load up on carbs, fats and salty foods. Don’t go mad though – you could have up to 24 hours before you compete, so make sure you don’t eat so much you feel bloated, full and sick.

This is especially important if you have a physique competition or a photo shoot – you do not want to have a massive bloated belly and water retention around your joints!

  • Saturday – day of contest.

Keep your nutrition simple here – the focus should still be on carbs, with plenty of fluids and a decent amount of sodium, but once again, don’t overdo it. Only eat foods you know you tolerate well, and that give you energy.

The Wrap Up

Can you lose weight super fast in a week?

Yes.

Can you do it healthily?

Kind of.

These tactics are 100% NOT to be used by general dieters, or if you’re just preparing for your weekly weigh-in. But, they can be used with success in high-level athletes.

Whenever you embark on something like this, it’s best to do it under medical supervision, and to try a test run a few weeks out to make sure you can handle it.

Better still, make sure you’re at your desired weight a week out, then you can focus on chilling out, enjoying the week leading up to your event, and performing your best.

Magic Mike
Coach
Result Based Training

0 Comments

Leave a reply